Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Gateway of India


A triumphal arch or arch of triumph is a building in the shape of a monumental gate with arch , usually built to celebrate a victory in war, in vogue in ancient cultures. This tradition was born in the Ancient Rome, and many arches built in the imperial age can still be admired today in the Eternal City. Some triumphal arches were made ​​of stone, in Rome in marble or travertine, and were therefore destined to be permanent. In other cases, temporary arches were erected, constructed to be used during celebrations and parades and then dismantled.


Generally, only the arches erected in Rome are called triumphal because only in the City were celebrated triumphs. The arches erected elsewhere are generally defined as fees. Mumbai or Bombay attributed to the new name has many facets: the charm of Bollywood cinema, the cricket on the maidan in the weekend, the bhel puri on the beach at Chowpatty and red double-decker buses. But also the infamous cages of the red-light district, the largest slum in Asia, the autonomist policies that often result in violence and the powerful lords of the mafia.

It makes a perfect backdrop for this dramatic situation an urban landscape looking eminently Victorian reminiscence more than a prosperous industrial city of the nineteenth century English than any other thing you would expect to find on the shores of the Arabian Sea. The streets of Mumbai are vivacity amazing, the nightlife of the city is the most hectic of India and there are more markets than those who never would you be able to explore.

Gateway of India is a monument in Colaba in Mumbai overlooking the harbor at the end of Apollo Bunder. This triumphal arch in yellow basalt is an exaggerated colonial monument, conceived after the visit of King George V, in 1911. Today, the arch is a popular symbol of the city and one of the favorite local hangouts in the evenings and weekends. The stalls, the vendors of balloons, photographers and snake charmers give the area the air of a festive bazaar. The project is inspired by a monument in the style of the sixteenth century. The arch was officially opened in 1924, but became superfluous only 24 years later, when the last British regiment left India ceremoniously.

Gateway of India begun in 1911 and completed in 1924 Since the opening of the Suez Canal to the advent of airliners was here that the English ships landed in India. And what better place to showcase the power of the British Empire with this impressive triumphal arch of basalt in style Indo-Saracenic.

Gateway of India in Mumbai overlooking the harbor at the end of Apollo Bunder This triumphal arch in yellow basalt is a colonial monument exaggerated, conceived after the visit of King George V, in 1911 Today, the arch is a popular symbol of the city and one point favorite local hangout, evenings and weekends. The stalls, the vendors of balloons, photographers and snake charmers give the area the air of a festive bazaar.  The project is inspired by Gujarat, a memorial in the Muslim style of the sixteenth century. The arch was officially opened in 1924, but became redundant just 24 years later, when the last British regiment ceremoniously left India when passing below.

It's the most dynamic and cosmopolitan cities of India. A strip of land facing the sea, crowded with 15 million people on the move. And 'the largest port in the country and its major financial center. But above Mumbai, the former Bombay, is famous throughout the world as the capital of the Indian film industry: Bollywood. So much so that its film studios, almost all concentrated in an area called Film City, are now visited (with special permission). Yet in this "city of dreams", mirror the booming Indian economy, the poverty of a majority of the population remains evident, as are the contrasts between ancient traditions and modernity arrembante. A Mumbai may happen to everything except one thing: get bored.

The Gateway of India, first of all, an impressive stone arch that stands proudly in front of the sea on the pier said Apollo Bunder, Colaba area. The Gateway of India is the true symbol of the city is in Mumbai as the Statue of Liberty is to New York. Built to commemorate the visit of King George V in 1911, by an irony of history became the place from which left India the latest British colonial troops in 1948.

Behind the Gateway is the most famous hotel in Asia The Taj Mahal Palace, built in 1903 by a wealthy Indian industrial wounded pride because he had been denied access to a hotel for whites only. Room prices today are certainly not for all but many tourists are allowed to enter at least the pleasure of having breakfast in its luxurious salons.

Closely linked to the colonial history of Mumbai is also the home where he lived for many years, the Mahatma Gandhi, the apostle of nonviolence which led India to independence from the British. Today turned into a Gandhi Museum contains objects that belonged to him such as the famous spinning wheel with you on wove clothes vintage photographs and a rich library on his thinking.

Another symbol of the Mumbai's colonial past is the monumental railway station Victoria Terminus Dadabhai Naoroji Road built in 1888 in an extravagant architectural style that blended Gothic Victorian taste. The UNESCO has declared a World Heritage Site. Brits realized also some waterfront that are popular today: the picturesque sunset stroll on Marine Drive to Chowpatty Beach, an opportunity to see old art deco villas.

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